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Wellbeing

Casualisation, Mindfulness and the Working Lives of Academics

By Dr Sarah Pinto and Dr Kirstie Close

‘Recent studies have demonstrated the ways in which mindfulness might be beneficial in higher education contexts, both for students and also, increasingly, for staff. On the one hand, mindfulness and other contemplative practices offer a way of easing some of the stress , anxiety and pressure of the contemporary university. This has the potential to give both students and staff new ways of managing what can be very difficult learning and working environments. On the other, however, the individualistic and instrumental version of mindfulness typically encountered or enacted in universities can be understood as little more than a neoliberal technology of management that does nothing to address the structural causes of stress , anxiety , and pressure in the university. Instead, this version of mindfulness relies on the individual to simply find new ways to cope…’

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Kirstie Close

Create Your Past is run by Dr Kirstie Close, an academically trained historian who has over ten years of teaching and research experience in Fiji, Australia and Papua New Guinea.
Kirstie Close

Create Your Past is run by Dr Kirstie Close, an academically trained historian who has over ten years of teaching and research experience in Fiji, Australia and Papua New Guinea.

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